HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY IS A GREAT TREATMENT FOR PEOPLE WHO’VE HAD A STROKE


Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy / Monday, April 15th, 2019

Did you know that Hyperbaric Oxygen is a proven effective therapy for stroke patients? As you know, time is of the essence when it comes to surviving a stroke. As soon as symptoms of a stroke are experienced, it’s imperative that 911 is called to save one’s life. When you’re having a stroke, your brain isn’t getting the blood it needs; therefore your brain is being deprived of oxygen, which can lead to brain damage. There are three types of stroke: transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke, symptoms are short, goes away with treatment). Ischemic stroke (blood clot travels from another part of your body to your brain, blocks blood flow to a portion of your heart. Symptoms do not go away without treatment). Hemorrhagic stroke (when a blood vessel in your brain ruptures or breaks, spilling blood into the surrounding tissues), causing an aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, and bleeding on the brain. It’s calculated that 87 percent of strokes are ischemic.

Using the Fast Test (face, arms, speech, time) to check for the most common symptoms of a stroke in yourself or someone else can help. Teach yourself, friends, family, and children the Fast Test as well.

FACE: Smile. If one side of the face droops, that is a symptom.
ARM: Raise both arms above your head. If one arm drops down, that is a symptom.
SPEECH: Say a short phrase. If you notice speech is slurred, that is also a symptom.
TIME: If you experience all of the above, time is of the essence. Call 911 immediately and let them know exactly when the symptoms began, tell them you fear you’re having a stroke. Do not drive yourself to the hospital. Wait for an ambulance.

Warning signs of a stroke are numbness/weakness in your limbs (usually on one side) and face. Confusion, not understanding what others are saying, not being able to communicate (difficulty speaking), trouble seeing out of both eyes (or one eye), dizziness, and a sudden severe headache.

High Blood Pressure (hypertension) is the leading cause of a stroke. Other causes are heart disease, diabetes, being overweight, tobacco, medications (blood thinning medication), age, genetic and gender (Women are somewhat less likely to have a stroke than men of the same age. But women have strokes at a later period in their life, making them less likely to recover and more likely to expire as a result). A person’s race is also a huge factor affecting African American’s and Hispanic Americans more often than other races in the United States.

Studies, as far back as 1964, has shown that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can heal the brain after a stroke. When a stroke occurs the brain cells stop receiving oxygen and nutrients, they need to survive, due to a blocked blood vessel blocked or a vessel that bursts. When this occurs, the area of the body corresponding to the altered cells become dysfunctional, then become dormant.

Here is how hyperbaric oxygen therapy can help restore dormant cells. Medical studies have proven that HBOT for stroke recovery victims can be useful in stimulating the dormant cells surrounding the damaged area or areas. These dormant cells, known as the ischemic penumbra, are responsible for the majority of post-stroke dysfunction. Pure oxygen will be distributed in the body, reaching the ischemia and hypoxic areas of the brain, and this will help reduce swollen tissues allowing more blood flow. HBOT will also revive dormant cells that were damaged because of the stroke, and restore a significant portion of their functionality. Also, this kind of alternative therapy has a positive effect on damaged nerve tissue, diminishing the possibility of future injury.

Dr. Elena Eustache is a specialist in neurofeedback and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, with a Ph.D. in Psychology and Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Dr. Elena Eustache helps her patients reach their full potential so they can live the life they’ve always dreamed of. You can read more about neurofeedback and hyperbaric oxygen therapy by visiting her blog. You may also find her on Instagram and Facebook.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *